Tumor viruses, oncogenes, and human cancer

Elliot Androphy, D. R. Lowy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We review the biology of transforming retroviruses and their relationship to cellular transforming genes (tumor oncogenes). Evidence is discussed for the involvement of a retrovirus in a newly described syndrome, 'adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma', which has a high incidence of skin involvement. This virus is related to the animal retroviruses which induce tumors in susceptible hosts after a long latent period. Cellular transforming genes encode proteins which directly change the oncogenic potential of a cell. These genes, which are altered forms of normal cellular genes, have been isolated from a wide variety of human tumors. Viral and cellular transforming genes produce their changes by at least two different mechanisms: abnormally high production of the normal protein encoded by these genes, or normal levels of an altered form of the protein.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-141
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume10
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Oncogenic Viruses
Oncogenes
Retroviridae
Neoplasms
Adult T Cell Leukemia Lymphoma
Proteins
Genes
Viruses
Skin
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Tumor viruses, oncogenes, and human cancer. / Androphy, Elliot; Lowy, D. R.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Vol. 10, No. 1, 1984, p. 125-141.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{61e42b17f7b94b1393f1ef63724f85c6,
title = "Tumor viruses, oncogenes, and human cancer",
abstract = "We review the biology of transforming retroviruses and their relationship to cellular transforming genes (tumor oncogenes). Evidence is discussed for the involvement of a retrovirus in a newly described syndrome, 'adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma', which has a high incidence of skin involvement. This virus is related to the animal retroviruses which induce tumors in susceptible hosts after a long latent period. Cellular transforming genes encode proteins which directly change the oncogenic potential of a cell. These genes, which are altered forms of normal cellular genes, have been isolated from a wide variety of human tumors. Viral and cellular transforming genes produce their changes by at least two different mechanisms: abnormally high production of the normal protein encoded by these genes, or normal levels of an altered form of the protein.",
author = "Elliot Androphy and Lowy, {D. R.}",
year = "1984",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "125--141",
journal = "Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology",
issn = "0190-9622",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tumor viruses, oncogenes, and human cancer

AU - Androphy, Elliot

AU - Lowy, D. R.

PY - 1984

Y1 - 1984

N2 - We review the biology of transforming retroviruses and their relationship to cellular transforming genes (tumor oncogenes). Evidence is discussed for the involvement of a retrovirus in a newly described syndrome, 'adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma', which has a high incidence of skin involvement. This virus is related to the animal retroviruses which induce tumors in susceptible hosts after a long latent period. Cellular transforming genes encode proteins which directly change the oncogenic potential of a cell. These genes, which are altered forms of normal cellular genes, have been isolated from a wide variety of human tumors. Viral and cellular transforming genes produce their changes by at least two different mechanisms: abnormally high production of the normal protein encoded by these genes, or normal levels of an altered form of the protein.

AB - We review the biology of transforming retroviruses and their relationship to cellular transforming genes (tumor oncogenes). Evidence is discussed for the involvement of a retrovirus in a newly described syndrome, 'adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma', which has a high incidence of skin involvement. This virus is related to the animal retroviruses which induce tumors in susceptible hosts after a long latent period. Cellular transforming genes encode proteins which directly change the oncogenic potential of a cell. These genes, which are altered forms of normal cellular genes, have been isolated from a wide variety of human tumors. Viral and cellular transforming genes produce their changes by at least two different mechanisms: abnormally high production of the normal protein encoded by these genes, or normal levels of an altered form of the protein.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0021350596&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0021350596&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 6319461

AN - SCOPUS:0021350596

VL - 10

SP - 125

EP - 141

JO - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology

JF - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology

SN - 0190-9622

IS - 1

ER -