UCP3 and thyroid hormone involvement in methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia

Jon E. Sprague, Nicole M. Mallett, Daniel Rusyniak, Edward Mills

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Here, we determined the extent of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis and uncoupling protein-3 (UCP3) involvement in methamphetamine (METH)-induced hyperthermia. Sprague-Dawley rats treated with METH (40 mg/kg, s.c.) responded with a hyperthermic response that peaked 1 h post-treatment and was sustained through 2 h. After METH treatment, thyroparathyroidectomized (TX) animals developed hypothermia that was sustained for the 3 h monitoring period. In TX animals supplemented for 5 days with levothyroxine (100 μg/kg, s.c.), METH-induced hypothermia was eliminated and the hyperthermic response was restored. Thyroid hormone levels (T3 and T4), measured in euthyroid animals 1 h after METH, remained unchanged. As seen in rats, 1 h post-METH (20 mg/kg, i.p.) treatment, wild-type (WT) mice developed profound hyperthermia that was sustained for 2 h. In marked contrast, UCP3-/- animals developed a markedly blunted hyperthermic response at 1 h compared to WT animals. Furthermore, UCP3-/- mice could not sustain this slight elevation in temperature. Two hours post-METH treatment, UCP3-/- animal temperature returned to baseline temperatures. UCP3-/- mice were also completely protected against the lethal effects of METH, whereas 40% of WT mice succumbed to the hyperthermia. These findings suggest that thyroid hormone plays a permissive role in the thermogenic effects induced by METH. Furthermore, the findings indicate that UCP3 plays a major role in the development and maintenance of the hyperthermia induced by METH. The relationship of these results to the hyperthermia induced by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is also discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1339-1343
Number of pages5
JournalBiochemical Pharmacology
Volume68
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2004

Fingerprint

Induced Hyperthermia
Methamphetamine
Thyroid Hormones
Animals
Proteins
Hypothermia
Thyroxine
Temperature
Rats
Fever
Uncoupling Protein 3
N-Methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine
Induced Hypothermia
Wild Animals
Triiodothyronine
Therapeutics
Sprague Dawley Rats
Thyroid Gland
Maintenance

Keywords

  • 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine
  • HPT
  • Hyperthermia
  • hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid
  • MDMA
  • METH
  • methamphetamine
  • Methamphetamine
  • ryanodine receptor
  • RyR
  • SNS
  • sympathetic nervous system
  • thyroparathyroidectomized
  • TX
  • UCP
  • uncoupling proteins
  • wild-type
  • WT

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

UCP3 and thyroid hormone involvement in methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. / Sprague, Jon E.; Mallett, Nicole M.; Rusyniak, Daniel; Mills, Edward.

In: Biochemical Pharmacology, Vol. 68, No. 7, 01.10.2004, p. 1339-1343.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sprague, Jon E. ; Mallett, Nicole M. ; Rusyniak, Daniel ; Mills, Edward. / UCP3 and thyroid hormone involvement in methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. In: Biochemical Pharmacology. 2004 ; Vol. 68, No. 7. pp. 1339-1343.
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