Uncovering the interplay between CD8, CD4 and antibody responses to complex pathogens

Magdalini Moutaftsi, David C. Tscharke, Kerrie Vaughan, David M. Koelle, Lawrence Stern, Mauricio Calvo-Calle, Francis Ennis, Masanori Terajima, Gerd Sutter, Shane Crotty, Ingo Drexler, Genoveffa Franchini, Jon W. Yewdell, Steven R. Head, Janice Blum, Bjoern Peters, Alex Sette

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

Vaccinia virus (VACV) was used as the vaccine strain to eradicate smallpox. VACV is still administered to healthcare workers or researchers who are at risk of contracting the virus, and to military personnel. Thus, VACV represents a weapon against outbreaks, both natural (e.g., monkeypox) or man-made (bioterror). This virus is also used as a vector for experimental vaccine development (cancer/infectious disease). As a prototypic poxvirus, VACV is a model system for studying host-pathogen interactions. Until recently, little was known about the targets of host immune responses, which was likely owing to VACVs large genome (>200 open reading frames). However, the last few years have witnessed an explosion of data, and VACV has quickly become a useful model to study adaptive immune responses. This review summarizes and highlights key findings based on identification of VACV antigens targeted by the immune system (CD4, CD8 and antibodies) and the complex interplay between responses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-239
Number of pages19
JournalFuture Microbiology
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2010

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Keywords

  • Adaptiv immuntly
  • Epitopes
  • Immunodominant
  • Protection
  • Vaccinia virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Moutaftsi, M., Tscharke, D. C., Vaughan, K., Koelle, D. M., Stern, L., Calvo-Calle, M., Ennis, F., Terajima, M., Sutter, G., Crotty, S., Drexler, I., Franchini, G., Yewdell, J. W., Head, S. R., Blum, J., Peters, B., & Sette, A. (2010). Uncovering the interplay between CD8, CD4 and antibody responses to complex pathogens. Future Microbiology, 5(2), 221-239. https://doi.org/10.2217/fmb.09.110