Underestimations of blood alcohol concentration predict event-specific negative consequences

Sean P. Grant, Joseph W. Labrie, Justin F. Hummer, Andrew Lac

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The current study sought to establish in vivo misperception of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) as a predictor of event-specific alcohol-consumption-related negative consequences. During spring 2010, 225 (56.4% male) college students, who had consumed at least one alcoholic drink within the 2 hr prior to assessment, completed a questionnaire, gave a breath sample to assess breath alcohol content, and later completed a follow-up questionnaire. Underestimation of BAC was predictive of event-specific, alcohol-consumption-related negative consequences, over and above other factors including total drinks consumed. This study highlights the need for more focused BAC education strategies at American universities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1309-1317
Number of pages9
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume46
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 27 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

alcohol
Alcohol Drinking
event
alcohol consumption
questionnaire
Alcohols
alcoholism
Students
Education
Blood Alcohol Content
university
education
Surveys and Questionnaires
student

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Alcohol-related consequences
  • BAC misperception
  • Blood alcohol concentration (BAC)
  • College students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Underestimations of blood alcohol concentration predict event-specific negative consequences. / Grant, Sean P.; Labrie, Joseph W.; Hummer, Justin F.; Lac, Andrew.

In: Substance Use and Misuse, Vol. 46, No. 10, 27.07.2011, p. 1309-1317.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grant, Sean P. ; Labrie, Joseph W. ; Hummer, Justin F. ; Lac, Andrew. / Underestimations of blood alcohol concentration predict event-specific negative consequences. In: Substance Use and Misuse. 2011 ; Vol. 46, No. 10. pp. 1309-1317.
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