Understanding low-income African American women's expectations, preferences, and priorities in prenatal care

Brownsne Tucker Edmonds, Marjie Mogul, Judy A. Shea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We aimed to explore factors affecting prenatal care attendance and preferences for prenatal care experiences among low-income black women by conducting a focus group study using a community-based participatory research framework and nominal group technique. Discussions were audiorecorded, transcribed, and coded by trained reviewers. Friends/family and baby's health were the top attendance motivators. Greatest barriers were insurance, transportation, and ambivalence. Facilitators included transportation services, social support, and resource education. In a "perfect system," women wanted continuity of care, personal connection, and caring/respect from providers. Relationship-centered maternity care models may mitigate disparities. Group prenatal care may provide the continuity and support system desired.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-157
Number of pages9
JournalFamily and Community Health
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Fingerprint

Prenatal Care
African Americans
Community-Based Participatory Research
Continuity of Patient Care
Family Health
Insurance
Focus Groups
Social Support
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Understanding low-income African American women's expectations, preferences, and priorities in prenatal care. / Tucker Edmonds, Brownsne; Mogul, Marjie; Shea, Judy A.

In: Family and Community Health, Vol. 38, No. 2, 01.04.2015, p. 149-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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