Unusual forms of carcinoma of the urinary bladder

Robert H. Young, John Eble

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

119 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Carcinomas of the urinary bladder, which differ histologically from the usual transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder, are reviewed. These tumors, which account for approximately 15% of all bladder carcinomas, have diverse microscopic appearances. They fall into four major categories: variant forms of urothelial (transitional cell) carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and undifferentiated carcinoma. In the first category, the most common are carcinomas with glandular or squamous differentiation. Less common, but more troublesome diagnostically, are variants in which the cells are spindle shaped (sarcomatoid carcinoma), form small cysts (microcystic carcinoma), or differentiate toward trophoblast. In other variants, the stroma has unusual features that may lead to diagnostic difficulty. These are carcinomas with pseudosarcomatous stroma, osseous or cartilaginous metaplasia, or osteoclast-type giant cells. Also reviewed are squamous cell carcinoma and its variant, verrucous carcinoma. Vesical adenocarcinoma has several variants, including signet-ring cell and clear cell types. Finally, the category of undifferentiated carcinoma, including small cell carcinoma, giant cell carcinoma, and lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma, is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)948-965
Number of pages18
JournalHuman Pathology
Volume22
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Urinary Bladder
Carcinoma
Transitional Cell Carcinoma
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Adenocarcinoma
Giant Cell Carcinoma
Verrucous Carcinoma
Small Cell Carcinoma
Metaplasia
Trophoblasts
Osteoclasts
Giant Cells
Cysts
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • adenocarcinoma
  • bladder
  • carcinoma
  • microcystic carcinoma
  • sarcomatoid carcinoma
  • squamous cell carcinoma
  • transitional cell carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Unusual forms of carcinoma of the urinary bladder. / Young, Robert H.; Eble, John.

In: Human Pathology, Vol. 22, No. 10, 1991, p. 948-965.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Young, Robert H. ; Eble, John. / Unusual forms of carcinoma of the urinary bladder. In: Human Pathology. 1991 ; Vol. 22, No. 10. pp. 948-965.
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