Ureterocystoplasty

Is it necessary to detubularize the distal ureter?

Mark C. Adams, John W. Brock, John C. Pope IV, Richard C. Rink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The conventional technique for ureterocystoplasty includes complete mobilization and incision of the ureter. We describe a modified procedure in which the distal 3 cm. of ureter are left in place and intact. Materials and Methods: This modification has been used in our last 13 cases of ureterocystoplasty. The first 7 patients with followup of more than a year (mean 28 months) are included in this series, and 6 have undergone video urodynamic evaluation before and after reconstruction. Results: Clinical results have been good. Four patients who have been toilet trained are continent. There have been no problems from stagnant urine in the intact ureter with only I case of pyelonephritis and no bladder calculi. Mean bladder capacity on cystometrogram has increased from 103 to 236 ml. after reconstruction and reached 137% of expected capacity for age and size (range 110 to 155%). No uninhibited contractions or problems with compliance have been noted. Conclusions: The distal ureter may be left intact for ureterocystoplasty to protect ureteral blood supply. This modified technique is sound from a physiological standpoint, technically easier and associated with good results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)851-853
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume160
Issue number3 I
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ureter
Urinary Bladder Calculi
Urodynamics
Pyelonephritis
Compliance
Urinary Bladder
Urine

Keywords

  • Bladder
  • Ureter
  • Urodynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Ureterocystoplasty : Is it necessary to detubularize the distal ureter? / Adams, Mark C.; Brock, John W.; Pope IV, John C.; Rink, Richard C.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 160, No. 3 I, 1998, p. 851-853.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Adams, MC, Brock, JW, Pope IV, JC & Rink, RC 1998, 'Ureterocystoplasty: Is it necessary to detubularize the distal ureter?', Journal of Urology, vol. 160, no. 3 I, pp. 851-853. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-5347(01)62819-2
Adams, Mark C. ; Brock, John W. ; Pope IV, John C. ; Rink, Richard C. / Ureterocystoplasty : Is it necessary to detubularize the distal ureter?. In: Journal of Urology. 1998 ; Vol. 160, No. 3 I. pp. 851-853.
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