Urinary tract infection

Clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and management of the initial UTI in febrile infants and children 2 to 24 months

Kenneth B. Roberts, Stephen Downs, S. Maria Finnell, Stanley Hellerstein, Linda D. Shortliffe, Ellen R. Wald, J. Michael Zerin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

754 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To revise the American Academy of Pediatrics practice parameter regarding the diagnosis and management of initial urinary tract infections (UTIs) in febrile infants and young children. METHODS: Analysis of the medical literature published since the last version of the guideline was supplemented by analysis of data provided by authors of recent publications. The strength of evidence supporting each recommendation and the strength of the recommendation were assessed and graded. RESULTS: Diagnosis is made on the basis of the presence of both pyuria and at least 50 000 colonies per mL of a single uropathogenic organism in an appropriately collected specimen of urine. After 7 to 14 days of antimicrobial treatment, close clinical follow-up monitoring should be maintained to permit prompt diagnosis and treatment of recurrent infections. Ultrasonography of the kidneys and bladder should be performed to detect anatomic abnormalities. Data from the most recent 6 studies do not support the use of antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent febrile recurrent UTI in infants without vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) or with grade I to IV VUR. Therefore, a voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) is not recommended routinely after the first UTI; VCUG is indicated if renal and bladder ultrasonography reveals hydronephrosis, scarring, or other findings that would suggest either highgrade VUR or obstructive uropathy and in other atypical or complex clinical circumstances. VCUG should also be performed if there is a recurrence of a febrile UTI. The recommendations in this guideline do not indicate an exclusive course of treatment or serve as a standard of care; variations may be appropriate. Recommendations about antimicrobial prophylaxis and implications for performance of VCUG are based on currently available evidence. As with all American Academy of Pediatrics clinical guidelines, the recommendations will be reviewed routinely and incorporate new evidence, such as data from the Randomized Intervention for Children With Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR) study. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in this revision include criteria for the diagnosis of UTI and recommendations for imaging.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)595-610
Number of pages16
JournalPediatrics
Volume128
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Practice Management
Vesico-Ureteral Reflux
Practice Guidelines
Urinary Tract Infections
Fever
Guidelines
Ultrasonography
Urinary Bladder
Pyuria
Pediatrics
Kidney
Hydronephrosis
Standard of Care
Cicatrix
Therapeutics
Urine
Recurrence
Infection

Keywords

  • Children
  • Infants
  • Urinary tract infection
  • Vesicoureteral reflux
  • Voiding cystourethrography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Urinary tract infection : Clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and management of the initial UTI in febrile infants and children 2 to 24 months. / Roberts, Kenneth B.; Downs, Stephen; Finnell, S. Maria; Hellerstein, Stanley; Shortliffe, Linda D.; Wald, Ellen R.; Zerin, J. Michael.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 128, No. 3, 09.2011, p. 595-610.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roberts, Kenneth B. ; Downs, Stephen ; Finnell, S. Maria ; Hellerstein, Stanley ; Shortliffe, Linda D. ; Wald, Ellen R. ; Zerin, J. Michael. / Urinary tract infection : Clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and management of the initial UTI in febrile infants and children 2 to 24 months. In: Pediatrics. 2011 ; Vol. 128, No. 3. pp. 595-610.
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