US trends in disability and institutionalization among older Blacks and Whites

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Abstract

Objectives. This study estimated and compared the prevalence of disability and institutionalization in 1982, 1984, and 1989 among the older Black and White populations of the United States. Methods. Data on over 1100 Blacks and 14 000 Whites in each of a series of three National Long Term Care Surveys were used. Results. Diverging trends for Blacks and Whites led to statistically significant increases in the age- and sex-adjusted odds of disability (19%) and institutionalization (31%) for Blacks relative to Whites. Conclusions. Black and White disparities in disability appear to have widened, while disparities in institutionalization appear to have narrowed during the decade of the 1980s.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)438-440
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume87
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1997

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  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

US trends in disability and institutionalization among older Blacks and Whites. / Clark, Daniel.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 87, No. 3, 03.1997, p. 438-440.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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