Use of abdominal radical trachelectomy to treat cervical cancer greater than 2 cm in diameter

Balazs Lintner, Srdjan Saso, Laszlo Tarnai, Zoltan Novak, Laszlo Palfalvi, Giuseppe Del Priore, J. Richard Smith, Laszlo Ungar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Invasive cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers, with 500,000 new cases diagnosed annually. Fertility preservation has become an important component of the overall quality of life of many cancer survivors. Expert opinion has suggested that fertility-sparing surgery should be limited to those patients diagnosed with cervical cancer less than 2 cm in diameter. Our objective was to report our abdominal radical trachelectomy (ART) experience in the opposite group of patientsVthose with a cervical cancer more than 2 cm in diameter. Methods: Between 1999 and 2006, a total of 45 patients with cervical carcinoma at International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IB1-IB2 measuring more than 2 cm in diameter underwent fertility-sparing ART and pelvic lymphadenectomy at the 3 institutions where the authors are based (Budapest, Hungary; London, United Kingdom; New York, United States). They were followed up for more than 5 years. Results: For 69% of patients (n = 31), completed ART was considered to have been curative, and no adjuvant treatment was advised. Of those patients, 93.5% (n = 29) were alive at the time of follow-up. Thirty-one percent of patients (n = 14) underwent immediate completion of radical hysterectomy. Three of 8 patients who wished to fall pregnant delivered healthy neonates. Conclusions: The 5-year survival rate (93.5%) for this case series is equal (or better) to rates reported in the literature for patient treated with radical hysterectomy. Our survival data seem to support the hypothesis that ART is a safe treatment option for patients with invasive cervical cancer lesions of more than 2 cm.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1065-1070
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecological Cancer
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

Fingerprint

Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Hysterectomy
Fertility
Fertility Preservation
Trachelectomy
Hungary
Expert Testimony
Lymph Node Excision
Gynecology
Obstetrics
Survivors
Neoplasms
Survival Rate
Quality of Life
Newborn Infant
Carcinoma
Survival
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • 2-cm diameter ORIGINAL STUDY
  • Abdominal radical trachelectomy
  • Early-stage cervical cancer
  • Radical hysterectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Use of abdominal radical trachelectomy to treat cervical cancer greater than 2 cm in diameter. / Lintner, Balazs; Saso, Srdjan; Tarnai, Laszlo; Novak, Zoltan; Palfalvi, Laszlo; Del Priore, Giuseppe; Smith, J. Richard; Ungar, Laszlo.

In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, Vol. 23, No. 6, 07.2013, p. 1065-1070.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lintner, B, Saso, S, Tarnai, L, Novak, Z, Palfalvi, L, Del Priore, G, Smith, JR & Ungar, L 2013, 'Use of abdominal radical trachelectomy to treat cervical cancer greater than 2 cm in diameter', International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, vol. 23, no. 6, pp. 1065-1070. https://doi.org/10.1097/IGC.0b013e318295fb41
Lintner, Balazs ; Saso, Srdjan ; Tarnai, Laszlo ; Novak, Zoltan ; Palfalvi, Laszlo ; Del Priore, Giuseppe ; Smith, J. Richard ; Ungar, Laszlo. / Use of abdominal radical trachelectomy to treat cervical cancer greater than 2 cm in diameter. In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer. 2013 ; Vol. 23, No. 6. pp. 1065-1070.
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