Use of health information technology by children's hospitals in the United States

Nir Menachemi, Robert G. Brooks, Ellen Schwalenstocker, Lisa Simpson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to examine the adoption of health information technology by children's hospitals and to document barriers and priorities as they relate to health information technology adoption. METHODS. Primary data of interest were obtained through the use of a survey instrument distributed to the chief information officers of 199 children's hospitals in the United States. Data were collected on current and future use of a variety of clinical health information technology and telemedicine applications, organizational priorities, barriers to use of health information technology, and hospital and chief information officer characteristics. RESULTS. Among the 109 responding hospitals (55%), common clinical applications included clinical scheduling (86.2%), transcription (85.3%), and pharmacy (81.9%) and laboratory (80.7%) information. Electronic health records (48.6%), computerized order entry (40.4%), and clinical decision support systems (35.8%) were less common. The most common barriers to health information technology adoption were vendors' inability to deliver products or services to satisfaction (85.4%), lack of staffing resources (82.3%), and difficulty in achieving end-user acceptance (80.2%). The most frequent priority for hospitals was to implement technology to reduce medical errors or to promote safety (72.5%). CONCLUSION. This first national look at health information technology use by children's hospitals demonstrates the progress in health information technology adoption, current barriers, and priorities for these institutions. In addition, the findings can serve as important benchmarks for future study in this area. Pediatrics 2009;123: S80-S84.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics
Volume123
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medical Informatics
Clinical Decision Support Systems
Benchmarking
Medical Errors
Telemedicine
Electronic Health Records
Pediatrics
Technology
Safety

Keywords

  • Children's hospitals
  • Health information technology
  • National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Use of health information technology by children's hospitals in the United States. / Menachemi, Nir; Brooks, Robert G.; Schwalenstocker, Ellen; Simpson, Lisa.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 123, No. SUPPL. 2, 01.01.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Menachemi, Nir ; Brooks, Robert G. ; Schwalenstocker, Ellen ; Simpson, Lisa. / Use of health information technology by children's hospitals in the United States. In: Pediatrics. 2009 ; Vol. 123, No. SUPPL. 2.
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