Use of markers of dyslipidemia to identify overweight youth with insulin resistance

Tamara Hannon, Fida Bacha, So Jung Lee, Janine Janosky, Silva A. Arslanian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Markers to identify overweight youth with insulin resistance are of clinical importance. Objective: To determine if markers of dyslipidemia could identify overweight adolescents with insulin resistance. Setting, Participants, and Study Design: We retrospectively examined the association between markers of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance in 35 overweight [body mass index (BMI) of ≥95th percentile], white adolescents [mean age 13.5 ± (SD) 1.6 yr] who had participated in hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies to evaluate insulin action. Total body fat was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and abdominal fat with computed tomography. Using receiver-operating curves, cut-points for triglyceride (TG)/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and TG level to identify overweight individuals in the lowest tertile for insulin sensitivity were determined. Main Outcome Measure: Difference in the values for insulin sensitivity among the groups. Results: Of the markers examined (TG, TG/HDL, adiponectin, measures of adiposity and fasting insulin), fasting insulin was the strongest correlate of insulin sensitivity (r = 0.87, p <0.001). Youth with TG/HDL level ≥3 had lower insulin sensitivity (50% lower median values, p <0.01) and higher visceral fat (p <0.05) despite BMI comparable to that of youth with TG/HDL level

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)260-266
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Diabetes
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dyslipidemias
Insulin Resistance
Triglycerides
HDL Lipoproteins
Insulin
Fasting
Body Mass Index
HDL3 Lipoprotein
Abdominal Fat
Glucose Clamp Technique
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Adiponectin
Photon Absorptiometry
Adiposity
Adipose Tissue
Tomography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Euglycemic clamp
  • High-density lipoprotein cholesterol
  • Hyperinsulinemic
  • Insulin sensitivity
  • Obesity
  • Triglycerides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Use of markers of dyslipidemia to identify overweight youth with insulin resistance. / Hannon, Tamara; Bacha, Fida; Lee, So Jung; Janosky, Janine; Arslanian, Silva A.

In: Pediatric Diabetes, Vol. 7, No. 5, 10.2006, p. 260-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hannon, Tamara ; Bacha, Fida ; Lee, So Jung ; Janosky, Janine ; Arslanian, Silva A. / Use of markers of dyslipidemia to identify overweight youth with insulin resistance. In: Pediatric Diabetes. 2006 ; Vol. 7, No. 5. pp. 260-266.
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