Use of non-technical skills can predict medical student performance in acute care simulated scenarios

Jackie S. Cha, Nicholas E. Anton, Tomoko Mizota, Julie M. Hennings, Megan A. Rendina, Katie Stanton-Maxey, Hadley Ritter, Dimitrios Stefanidis, Denny Yu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Though the importance of physician non-technical (NT) skills for safe patient care is recognized, NT skills of medical students, our future physicians, has received little attention. This study aims to investigate the relationship of medical student NT skills and clinical performance during acute care team simulation (ACTS). Methods: Forty-one medical students participated in ACTS. A nurse confederate facilitated and evaluated clinical performance. Two raters assessed participants’ NT skills using an adapted NT assessment tool and overall NT skills score was calculated. Regressions predicting clinical performance using NT constructs were conducted. Results: Overall NT skills score significantly predicted students’ clinical performance (r2 = 0.178, p = 0.006). Four of the five individual NT constructs also significantly predicted performance: communication (r2 = 0.120, p = 0.027), situation awareness (r2 = 0.323, p < 0.001), leadership (r2 = 0.133, p = 0.019), and decision making (r2 = 0.163, p = 0.009). Conclusions: Medical student NT skills can predict clinical performance during ACTS. NT skills assessments can be used for targeted education for better feedback to students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Medical Students
Students
Physicians
Clinical Competence
Decision Making
Patient Care
Nurses
Communication
Education

Keywords

  • Acute care team simulation
  • General surgery clerkship
  • Medical students training
  • Team performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Use of non-technical skills can predict medical student performance in acute care simulated scenarios. / Cha, Jackie S.; Anton, Nicholas E.; Mizota, Tomoko; Hennings, Julie M.; Rendina, Megan A.; Stanton-Maxey, Katie; Ritter, Hadley; Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Yu, Denny.

In: American Journal of Surgery, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cha, Jackie S. ; Anton, Nicholas E. ; Mizota, Tomoko ; Hennings, Julie M. ; Rendina, Megan A. ; Stanton-Maxey, Katie ; Ritter, Hadley ; Stefanidis, Dimitrios ; Yu, Denny. / Use of non-technical skills can predict medical student performance in acute care simulated scenarios. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2018.
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