Using a cell phone-based glucose monitoring system for adolescent diabetes management

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction Mobile technology may be useful in addressing several issues in adolescent diabetes management. Purpose To assess the feasibility and acceptability of a cell phone glucose monitoring system for adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents. Methods The authors recruited patients with type 1 diabetes who had been diagnosed for at least 1 year. Each adolescent used the system for 6 months, filling out surveys every 3 months to measure their usability and satisfaction with the cell phone glucose monitoring system, as well as how use of the system might affect quality of family functioning and diabetes management. Results Adolescents reported positive feelings about the technology and the service, even though a concerning number of them had significant technical issues that affected continued use of the device. Nearly all thought that the clinic involvement in monitoring testing behavior was quite acceptable. The use of the Glucophone™ did not, however, significantly change the quality of life of the adolescents, their level of conflict with their parents, their reported self-management of diabetes, or their average glycemic control within the short time frame of the study. Conclusions As a feasibility study of the technology, this work was successful in demonstrating that cell phone glucose monitoring technology can be used in an adolescent population to track and assist in self-monitoring behavior. The authors speculate that explicitly attempting to change behavior, perhaps with the use of behavioral contracts, would enhance the technology's ability to improve outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-66
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetes Educator
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

Fingerprint

Cell Phones
Glucose
Technology
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Parents
Aptitude
Feasibility Studies
Self Care
Contracts
Emotions
Quality of Life
Equipment and Supplies
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Health Professions (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Using a cell phone-based glucose monitoring system for adolescent diabetes management. / Carroll, Aaron; DiMeglio, Linda; Stein, Stephanie; Marrero, David.

In: Diabetes Educator, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 59-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6eb391955d1448b0b7b624ba937a9409,
title = "Using a cell phone-based glucose monitoring system for adolescent diabetes management",
abstract = "Introduction Mobile technology may be useful in addressing several issues in adolescent diabetes management. Purpose To assess the feasibility and acceptability of a cell phone glucose monitoring system for adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents. Methods The authors recruited patients with type 1 diabetes who had been diagnosed for at least 1 year. Each adolescent used the system for 6 months, filling out surveys every 3 months to measure their usability and satisfaction with the cell phone glucose monitoring system, as well as how use of the system might affect quality of family functioning and diabetes management. Results Adolescents reported positive feelings about the technology and the service, even though a concerning number of them had significant technical issues that affected continued use of the device. Nearly all thought that the clinic involvement in monitoring testing behavior was quite acceptable. The use of the Glucophone™ did not, however, significantly change the quality of life of the adolescents, their level of conflict with their parents, their reported self-management of diabetes, or their average glycemic control within the short time frame of the study. Conclusions As a feasibility study of the technology, this work was successful in demonstrating that cell phone glucose monitoring technology can be used in an adolescent population to track and assist in self-monitoring behavior. The authors speculate that explicitly attempting to change behavior, perhaps with the use of behavioral contracts, would enhance the technology's ability to improve outcomes.",
author = "Aaron Carroll and Linda DiMeglio and Stephanie Stein and David Marrero",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0145721710387163",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
pages = "59--66",
journal = "Diabetes Educator",
issn = "0145-7217",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using a cell phone-based glucose monitoring system for adolescent diabetes management

AU - Carroll, Aaron

AU - DiMeglio, Linda

AU - Stein, Stephanie

AU - Marrero, David

PY - 2011/1

Y1 - 2011/1

N2 - Introduction Mobile technology may be useful in addressing several issues in adolescent diabetes management. Purpose To assess the feasibility and acceptability of a cell phone glucose monitoring system for adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents. Methods The authors recruited patients with type 1 diabetes who had been diagnosed for at least 1 year. Each adolescent used the system for 6 months, filling out surveys every 3 months to measure their usability and satisfaction with the cell phone glucose monitoring system, as well as how use of the system might affect quality of family functioning and diabetes management. Results Adolescents reported positive feelings about the technology and the service, even though a concerning number of them had significant technical issues that affected continued use of the device. Nearly all thought that the clinic involvement in monitoring testing behavior was quite acceptable. The use of the Glucophone™ did not, however, significantly change the quality of life of the adolescents, their level of conflict with their parents, their reported self-management of diabetes, or their average glycemic control within the short time frame of the study. Conclusions As a feasibility study of the technology, this work was successful in demonstrating that cell phone glucose monitoring technology can be used in an adolescent population to track and assist in self-monitoring behavior. The authors speculate that explicitly attempting to change behavior, perhaps with the use of behavioral contracts, would enhance the technology's ability to improve outcomes.

AB - Introduction Mobile technology may be useful in addressing several issues in adolescent diabetes management. Purpose To assess the feasibility and acceptability of a cell phone glucose monitoring system for adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents. Methods The authors recruited patients with type 1 diabetes who had been diagnosed for at least 1 year. Each adolescent used the system for 6 months, filling out surveys every 3 months to measure their usability and satisfaction with the cell phone glucose monitoring system, as well as how use of the system might affect quality of family functioning and diabetes management. Results Adolescents reported positive feelings about the technology and the service, even though a concerning number of them had significant technical issues that affected continued use of the device. Nearly all thought that the clinic involvement in monitoring testing behavior was quite acceptable. The use of the Glucophone™ did not, however, significantly change the quality of life of the adolescents, their level of conflict with their parents, their reported self-management of diabetes, or their average glycemic control within the short time frame of the study. Conclusions As a feasibility study of the technology, this work was successful in demonstrating that cell phone glucose monitoring technology can be used in an adolescent population to track and assist in self-monitoring behavior. The authors speculate that explicitly attempting to change behavior, perhaps with the use of behavioral contracts, would enhance the technology's ability to improve outcomes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79952057622&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79952057622&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0145721710387163

DO - 10.1177/0145721710387163

M3 - Article

C2 - 21106908

AN - SCOPUS:79952057622

VL - 37

SP - 59

EP - 66

JO - Diabetes Educator

JF - Diabetes Educator

SN - 0145-7217

IS - 1

ER -