Using human factors engineering to improve the effectiveness of infection prevention and control

Judith Anderson, Laura Lin Gosbee, Mary Bessesen, Linda Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human factors engineering is a discipline that studies the capabilities and limitations of humans and the design of devices and systems for improved performance. The principles of human factors engineering can be applied to infection prevention and control to study the interaction between the healthcare worker and the system that he or she is working with, including the use of devices, the built environment, and the demands and complexities of patient care. Some key challenges in infection prevention, such as delayed feedback to healthcare workers, high cognitive workload, and poor ergonomic design, are explained, as is how human factors engineering can be used for improvement and increased compliance with practices to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume38
Issue number8 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Human Engineering
Infection Control
Delivery of Health Care
Equipment Design
Cross Infection
Workload
Patient Care
Equipment and Supplies
Infection

Keywords

  • central catheterassociated bloodstream infection
  • checklist
  • delayed feedback
  • hand hygiene
  • hospital-acquired infections
  • human factors engineering
  • infection prevention and control
  • RCA
  • simulation
  • usability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Using human factors engineering to improve the effectiveness of infection prevention and control. / Anderson, Judith; Gosbee, Laura Lin; Bessesen, Mary; Williams, Linda.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 38, No. 8 SUPPL., 08.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Anderson, Judith ; Gosbee, Laura Lin ; Bessesen, Mary ; Williams, Linda. / Using human factors engineering to improve the effectiveness of infection prevention and control. In: Critical Care Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 38, No. 8 SUPPL.
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