Utilization of cell-transfer technique for molecular testing on hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections: A viable option for small biopsies that lack tumor tissues in paraffin block

Howard Wu, Stephen M. Jovonovich, Melissa Randolph, Kristin M. Post, Joyashree D. Sen, Kendra Curless, Liang Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context. - In some instances the standard method of doing molecular testing from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded block is not possible because of limited tissue. Tumor cell-enriched cell-transfer technique has been proven useful for performing immunocytochemistry and molecular testing on cytologic smears. Objective. - To establish the cell-transfer technique as a viable option for isolating tumor cells from hematoxylineosin (H&E)-stained slides. Design. - Molecular testing was performed by using the cell-transfer technique on 97 archived H&E-stained slides from a variety of different tumors. Results were compared to the conventional method of molecular testing. Results. - Polymerase chain reaction-based molecular testing via the cell-transfer technique was successfully performed on 82 of 97 samples (85%). This included 39 of 47 cases for EGFR, 10 of 11 cases for BRAF, and 33 of 39 cases for KRAS mutations. Eighty-one of 82 cell-transfer technique samples (99%) showed agreement with previous standard method results, including 4 mutations and 35 wild-type alleles for EGFR, 4 mutations and 6 wild-type alleles for BRAF, and 11 mutations and 21 wild-type alleles for KRAS. There was only 1 discrepancy: a cell-transfer technique with a false-negative KRAS result (wild type versus G12C). Conclusions. - Molecular testing performed on H&Estained sections via cell-transfer technique is useful when tissue from cell blocks and small surgical biopsy samples is exhausted and the only available material for testing is on H&E-stained slides.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1383-1389
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Volume140
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

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Hematoxylin
Eosine Yellowish-(YS)
Paraffin
Biopsy
Neoplasms
Mutation
Alleles
Materials Testing
Formaldehyde
Immunohistochemistry
Polymerase Chain Reaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Medical Laboratory Technology

Cite this

Utilization of cell-transfer technique for molecular testing on hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections : A viable option for small biopsies that lack tumor tissues in paraffin block. / Wu, Howard; Jovonovich, Stephen M.; Randolph, Melissa; Post, Kristin M.; Sen, Joyashree D.; Curless, Kendra; Cheng, Liang.

In: Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Vol. 140, No. 12, 01.12.2016, p. 1383-1389.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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