Vaccination against hepatitis B in patients with chronic liver disease awaiting liver transplantation

John C. Horlander, Nancy Boyle, Rajesh Manam, Melinda Schenk, Scott Herring, Paul Y. Kwo, Lawrence Lumeng, Naga Chalasani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Most transplant centers in the United States immunize patients awaiting liver transplantation against hepatitis B to prevent acquisition of hepatitis B through transplantation (de novo hepatitis B). A recent study showed that only 16% of patients with cirrhosis awaiting liver transplantation responded to single-dose recombinant vaccine. Methods: We studied the immunogenicity of double-dose recombinant vaccine in patients with cirrhosis awaiting liver transplantation. Results: Over a 4-year period (January 1994 to December 1997), 140 patients with cirrhosis without past or current hepatitis B infection were given double-dose recombinant vaccine (40 μg of Engerix B; Smith-Kline Beecham, Philadelphia, PA) at 0, 1 to 2, and 2 to 4 months. Hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb) was measured 1 to 3 months after completing vaccination. The response rate was 37%. However, HBsAb titers became undetectable in 35% of the responders during the post- transplant follow-up period. One hundred and thirty-seven patients underwent 144 liver transplantation procedures during the study period, and 3 patients developed de novo hepatitis B (2.2%). Livers transplanted from hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb)-positive donors was the source of de novo hepatitis B in all cases. Two of the 3 patients who developed de novo hepatitis B were immunized before transplantation and one of them was a responder. Conclusion: Although the response rate to double-dose recombinant vaccines is higher than the previously reported response to single-dose vaccine, it still is less than optimal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)304-307
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of the Medical Sciences
Volume318
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1999

Fingerprint

Hepatitis B
Liver Transplantation
Liver Diseases
Vaccination
Chronic Disease
Synthetic Vaccines
Hepatitis B Antibodies
Fibrosis
Transplantation
Transplants
Vaccines
Tissue Donors
Liver
Infection

Keywords

  • Hepatitis B
  • Orthotopic liver transplantation
  • Recombinant vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Vaccination against hepatitis B in patients with chronic liver disease awaiting liver transplantation. / Horlander, John C.; Boyle, Nancy; Manam, Rajesh; Schenk, Melinda; Herring, Scott; Kwo, Paul Y.; Lumeng, Lawrence; Chalasani, Naga.

In: American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Vol. 318, No. 5, 11.1999, p. 304-307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Horlander, John C. ; Boyle, Nancy ; Manam, Rajesh ; Schenk, Melinda ; Herring, Scott ; Kwo, Paul Y. ; Lumeng, Lawrence ; Chalasani, Naga. / Vaccination against hepatitis B in patients with chronic liver disease awaiting liver transplantation. In: American Journal of the Medical Sciences. 1999 ; Vol. 318, No. 5. pp. 304-307.
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