Vaccine assembly from surface proteins of Staphylococcus aureus

Yukiko K. Stranger-Jones, Taeok Bae, Olaf Schneewind

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

225 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of hospital-acquired infection. Because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, these infections represent a serious public health threat. To develop a broadly protective vaccine, we tested cell wall-anchored surface proteins of S. aureus as antigens in a murine model of abscess formation. Immunization with four antigens (IsdA, IsdB, SdrD, and SdrE) generated significant protective immunity that correlated with the induction of opsonophagocytic antibodies. When assembled into a combined vaccine, the four surface proteins afforded high levels of protection against invasive disease or lethal challenge with human clinical S. aureus isolates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16942-16947
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume103
Issue number45
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 7 2006

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Staphylococcus aureus
Membrane Proteins
Vaccines
Combined Vaccines
Antigens
Protein S
Cross Infection
Abscess
Cell Wall
Immunity
Immunization
Public Health
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Antibodies
Infection

Keywords

  • Disease protection
  • Opsonophagocytosis
  • Reverse vaccinology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Vaccine assembly from surface proteins of Staphylococcus aureus. / Stranger-Jones, Yukiko K.; Bae, Taeok; Schneewind, Olaf.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 103, No. 45, 07.11.2006, p. 16942-16947.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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