Vascular damage by ultrasound-activated microbubble induced vesselinvagination

Hong Chen, Andrew A. Brayman, Thomas J. Matula, Andrew Evan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vascular bioeffects produced by ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles areprimarily manifested as damage to microvessels. The objective of this work is todirectly observe the transient dynamics of bubble-vessel interactions andcorrelate the observed interactions with associated vascular damage.Microbubbles were perfused into microvessels in ex vivo rat mesenteries and thenexcited by a single 2 s long ultrasound pulse at 1 MHz. Meanwhile, 14high-speed photomicrographic images were acquired using 50 ns shutter speeds.The targeted region was then examined by histology and transmission electronmicroscopy (TEM). Image registration was used to identify the specific vesselsthat the corresponding high-speed images were captured. The recorded high-speedimages revealed that bubble-vessel interactions caused vessel wall distention(motion outward against the surrounding tissue) and invagination (motion inwardtoward the lumen). Invagination exceeding distention was observed in 60 out of70 cases. Significant vessel invagination was correlated with vascular damagethat was characterized by a separation of the endothelium from the surroundingtissue as revealed by both the histology and TEM analyses. The separation of theendothelium from the surrounding tissue is consistent with damage caused bytensile stresses at the vessel walls that lead to vessel invagination. Thissuggests that invagination may be an important mechanism by which microbubblescause vascular damage.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium
Pages678-681
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Event2010 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, IUS 2010 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Oct 11 2010Oct 14 2010

Other

Other2010 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, IUS 2010
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period10/11/1010/14/10

Fingerprint

vessels
damage
histology
bubbles
endothelium
lumens
shutters
interactions
rats
high speed
pulses

Keywords

  • microbubbles
  • microvessels
  • vascular damage
  • vessel invagiantion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Chen, H., Brayman, A. A., Matula, T. J., & Evan, A. (2010). Vascular damage by ultrasound-activated microbubble induced vesselinvagination. In Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium (pp. 678-681). [5935994] https://doi.org/10.1109/ULTSYM.2010.5935994

Vascular damage by ultrasound-activated microbubble induced vesselinvagination. / Chen, Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Matula, Thomas J.; Evan, Andrew.

Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. 2010. p. 678-681 5935994.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Chen, H, Brayman, AA, Matula, TJ & Evan, A 2010, Vascular damage by ultrasound-activated microbubble induced vesselinvagination. in Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium., 5935994, pp. 678-681, 2010 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, IUS 2010, San Diego, CA, United States, 10/11/10. https://doi.org/10.1109/ULTSYM.2010.5935994
Chen H, Brayman AA, Matula TJ, Evan A. Vascular damage by ultrasound-activated microbubble induced vesselinvagination. In Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. 2010. p. 678-681. 5935994 https://doi.org/10.1109/ULTSYM.2010.5935994
Chen, Hong ; Brayman, Andrew A. ; Matula, Thomas J. ; Evan, Andrew. / Vascular damage by ultrasound-activated microbubble induced vesselinvagination. Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. 2010. pp. 678-681
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