Venlafaxine extended release in the short-term treatment of depressed and anxious primary care patients with multisomatoform disorder

Kurt Kroenke, Nicholas Messina, Isma Benattia, Jay Graepel, Jeff Musgnung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This pilot study explored the efficacy and tolerability of extended-release venlafaxine (venlafaxine ER) in anxious and/or depressed patients with multisomatoform disorder (MSD). Method: This 12-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind study evaluated adult primary care outpatients with MSD and comorbid major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, or social anxiety disorder (DSM-IV criteria). The intent-to-treat population included 112 patients (venlafaxine ER, N = 55; placebo, N = 57). The primary efficacy variable was the change in the 15-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-15) somatic symptom severity score. Secondary outcomes included the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D-17) and for Anxiety (HAM-A), Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness (CGI-S) and -Improvement (CGI-I) scales, McGi1l Quality of Life Questionnaire Physical Symptoms Scale (MQOL-PS), and Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36-Item questionnaire (MOS SF-36). Data were collected from April 2003 to December 2003. Results: The decline by week 12 in PHQ-15 scores was significant (p < .0001) in both groups; however, the difference between the venlafaxine ER and placebo groups (-8.3 vs. -6.6, respectively) was not (p = .097). Improvement was greater with venlafaxine ER than placebo on the PHQ-15 pain subscale (p = .03), SF-36 bodily pain scale (26.1 vs. 14.5, p = .03), MQOL-PS (-11.7 vs. -6.0, p = .02), HAM-A psychic anxiety subscale (p = .02), SF-36 mental component summary (p = .03), time to response (54 vs. 71 days, p = .01), and CGI-I scale (p = .009). Venlafaxine ER was generally well tolerated. Conclusion: These results suggest that venlafaxine ER may be effective in relieving some types of somatic physical symptoms, particularly pain, in patients with depression and/or anxiety disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-80
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume67
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2006

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Primary Health Care
Anxiety
Placebos
Anxiety Disorders
Pain
Therapeutics
Quality of Life
Depression
Major Depressive Disorder
Venlafaxine Hydrochloride
Double-Blind Method
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Outpatients
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Surveys and Questionnaires
Health
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Venlafaxine extended release in the short-term treatment of depressed and anxious primary care patients with multisomatoform disorder. / Kroenke, Kurt; Messina, Nicholas; Benattia, Isma; Graepel, Jay; Musgnung, Jeff.

In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Vol. 67, No. 1, 01.2006, p. 72-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: This pilot study explored the efficacy and tolerability of extended-release venlafaxine (venlafaxine ER) in anxious and/or depressed patients with multisomatoform disorder (MSD). Method: This 12-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind study evaluated adult primary care outpatients with MSD and comorbid major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, or social anxiety disorder (DSM-IV criteria). The intent-to-treat population included 112 patients (venlafaxine ER, N = 55; placebo, N = 57). The primary efficacy variable was the change in the 15-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-15) somatic symptom severity score. Secondary outcomes included the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D-17) and for Anxiety (HAM-A), Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness (CGI-S) and -Improvement (CGI-I) scales, McGi1l Quality of Life Questionnaire Physical Symptoms Scale (MQOL-PS), and Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36-Item questionnaire (MOS SF-36). Data were collected from April 2003 to December 2003. Results: The decline by week 12 in PHQ-15 scores was significant (p < .0001) in both groups; however, the difference between the venlafaxine ER and placebo groups (-8.3 vs. -6.6, respectively) was not (p = .097). Improvement was greater with venlafaxine ER than placebo on the PHQ-15 pain subscale (p = .03), SF-36 bodily pain scale (26.1 vs. 14.5, p = .03), MQOL-PS (-11.7 vs. -6.0, p = .02), HAM-A psychic anxiety subscale (p = .02), SF-36 mental component summary (p = .03), time to response (54 vs. 71 days, p = .01), and CGI-I scale (p = .009). Venlafaxine ER was generally well tolerated. Conclusion: These results suggest that venlafaxine ER may be effective in relieving some types of somatic physical symptoms, particularly pain, in patients with depression and/or anxiety disorders.",
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AU - Messina, Nicholas

AU - Benattia, Isma

AU - Graepel, Jay

AU - Musgnung, Jeff

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N2 - Objective: This pilot study explored the efficacy and tolerability of extended-release venlafaxine (venlafaxine ER) in anxious and/or depressed patients with multisomatoform disorder (MSD). Method: This 12-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind study evaluated adult primary care outpatients with MSD and comorbid major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, or social anxiety disorder (DSM-IV criteria). The intent-to-treat population included 112 patients (venlafaxine ER, N = 55; placebo, N = 57). The primary efficacy variable was the change in the 15-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-15) somatic symptom severity score. Secondary outcomes included the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D-17) and for Anxiety (HAM-A), Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness (CGI-S) and -Improvement (CGI-I) scales, McGi1l Quality of Life Questionnaire Physical Symptoms Scale (MQOL-PS), and Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36-Item questionnaire (MOS SF-36). Data were collected from April 2003 to December 2003. Results: The decline by week 12 in PHQ-15 scores was significant (p < .0001) in both groups; however, the difference between the venlafaxine ER and placebo groups (-8.3 vs. -6.6, respectively) was not (p = .097). Improvement was greater with venlafaxine ER than placebo on the PHQ-15 pain subscale (p = .03), SF-36 bodily pain scale (26.1 vs. 14.5, p = .03), MQOL-PS (-11.7 vs. -6.0, p = .02), HAM-A psychic anxiety subscale (p = .02), SF-36 mental component summary (p = .03), time to response (54 vs. 71 days, p = .01), and CGI-I scale (p = .009). Venlafaxine ER was generally well tolerated. Conclusion: These results suggest that venlafaxine ER may be effective in relieving some types of somatic physical symptoms, particularly pain, in patients with depression and/or anxiety disorders.

AB - Objective: This pilot study explored the efficacy and tolerability of extended-release venlafaxine (venlafaxine ER) in anxious and/or depressed patients with multisomatoform disorder (MSD). Method: This 12-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind study evaluated adult primary care outpatients with MSD and comorbid major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, or social anxiety disorder (DSM-IV criteria). The intent-to-treat population included 112 patients (venlafaxine ER, N = 55; placebo, N = 57). The primary efficacy variable was the change in the 15-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-15) somatic symptom severity score. Secondary outcomes included the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D-17) and for Anxiety (HAM-A), Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness (CGI-S) and -Improvement (CGI-I) scales, McGi1l Quality of Life Questionnaire Physical Symptoms Scale (MQOL-PS), and Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36-Item questionnaire (MOS SF-36). Data were collected from April 2003 to December 2003. Results: The decline by week 12 in PHQ-15 scores was significant (p < .0001) in both groups; however, the difference between the venlafaxine ER and placebo groups (-8.3 vs. -6.6, respectively) was not (p = .097). Improvement was greater with venlafaxine ER than placebo on the PHQ-15 pain subscale (p = .03), SF-36 bodily pain scale (26.1 vs. 14.5, p = .03), MQOL-PS (-11.7 vs. -6.0, p = .02), HAM-A psychic anxiety subscale (p = .02), SF-36 mental component summary (p = .03), time to response (54 vs. 71 days, p = .01), and CGI-I scale (p = .009). Venlafaxine ER was generally well tolerated. Conclusion: These results suggest that venlafaxine ER may be effective in relieving some types of somatic physical symptoms, particularly pain, in patients with depression and/or anxiety disorders.

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