Venous valvular insufficiency: Influence of a single venous valve (native and experimental)

Michael C. Dalsing, Stephen G. Lalka, Joseph L. Unthank, Richard J. Grieshop, Craig Nixon, Thomas Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

This report evaluates the ability of a single competent (native or experimental) superficial femoral vein valve to correct canine hindlimb venous insufficiency. The time to maximal ankle venous pressure after standing (VFT) and to 90% of that time after exercise (VRT90), and the minimal pressure after exercise (AVP) were measured in 17 greyhounds before intervention, after only the superficial femoral vein valve remained (n = 5), and after complete lower limb venous valvulotomy (n = 17). Three weeks later, 12 dogs underwent a native (n = 4) or experimental (n = 8) autogenous venous valve transplantation. Immediately and at 3 weeks after transplantation, venous pressure measurements were obtained. The manual strip test confirmed valve competence at the time of sacrifice. Only one valve transplant became incompetent. Immediately after single superficial femoral vein valve construction, VFT, AVP, and VRT90 measurements were not significantly different from normal. Three weeks after transplantation the AVP measurements were consistent with an insufficient venous system, whereas the VRT90 measurements were between and statistically different from both the control and totally incompetent system (p < 0.05). After the native valve but not the experimental valve transplantations VFT normalized. These data suggest that insertion of a single competent superficial femoral vein valve into an incompetent lower limb venous system corrects venous pressure measurements initially but soon provides only a partially competent system. The experimental valve, although competent, is less responsive than a native valve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)576-587
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of vascular surgery
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1991

    Fingerprint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this