Ventriculoperitoneal shunt malfunction from cerebrospinal fluid eosinophilia in children

Case-based update

R. Shane Tubbs, Mitchel Muhleman, Marios Loukas, Aaron Cohen-Gadol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Malfunction of cerebrospinal shunts is common and is due to multiple etiologies ranging from obstruction due to infiltrated brain tissue to mechanical disconnection. Discussion: We review the differential diagnosis and recommended evaluation and treatment for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) eosinophilia. Illustrative case: We report a child who, following the use of an antibiotics-impregnated ventricular catheter, developed sterile ventriculoperitoneal shunt malfunction thought to be due to profound CSF eosinophilia. Following removal of the catheter, the eosinophilia spontaneously resolved, and at long-term follow up, the patient has a functioning non-antibiotic impregnated shunt catheter. Conclusions: Patients presenting with signs of shunt malfunction but without signs of CSF infection and with a raised CSF eosinophilia should be suspicious for cellular obstruction of their shunt system, i.e., sterile shunt malfunction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)345-348
Number of pages4
JournalChild's Nervous System
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt
Eosinophilia
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Catheters
Differential Diagnosis
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Brain
Infection
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Complications
  • Hydrocephalus
  • Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ventriculoperitoneal shunt malfunction from cerebrospinal fluid eosinophilia in children : Case-based update. / Tubbs, R. Shane; Muhleman, Mitchel; Loukas, Marios; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron.

In: Child's Nervous System, Vol. 28, No. 3, 2012, p. 345-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1b25cbdaa9594001a65809c0e8c79baf,
title = "Ventriculoperitoneal shunt malfunction from cerebrospinal fluid eosinophilia in children: Case-based update",
abstract = "Introduction: Malfunction of cerebrospinal shunts is common and is due to multiple etiologies ranging from obstruction due to infiltrated brain tissue to mechanical disconnection. Discussion: We review the differential diagnosis and recommended evaluation and treatment for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) eosinophilia. Illustrative case: We report a child who, following the use of an antibiotics-impregnated ventricular catheter, developed sterile ventriculoperitoneal shunt malfunction thought to be due to profound CSF eosinophilia. Following removal of the catheter, the eosinophilia spontaneously resolved, and at long-term follow up, the patient has a functioning non-antibiotic impregnated shunt catheter. Conclusions: Patients presenting with signs of shunt malfunction but without signs of CSF infection and with a raised CSF eosinophilia should be suspicious for cellular obstruction of their shunt system, i.e., sterile shunt malfunction.",
keywords = "Complications, Hydrocephalus, Pediatrics",
author = "Tubbs, {R. Shane} and Mitchel Muhleman and Marios Loukas and Aaron Cohen-Gadol",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1007/s00381-011-1530-x",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "345--348",
journal = "Child's Nervous System",
issn = "0256-7040",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ventriculoperitoneal shunt malfunction from cerebrospinal fluid eosinophilia in children

T2 - Case-based update

AU - Tubbs, R. Shane

AU - Muhleman, Mitchel

AU - Loukas, Marios

AU - Cohen-Gadol, Aaron

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Introduction: Malfunction of cerebrospinal shunts is common and is due to multiple etiologies ranging from obstruction due to infiltrated brain tissue to mechanical disconnection. Discussion: We review the differential diagnosis and recommended evaluation and treatment for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) eosinophilia. Illustrative case: We report a child who, following the use of an antibiotics-impregnated ventricular catheter, developed sterile ventriculoperitoneal shunt malfunction thought to be due to profound CSF eosinophilia. Following removal of the catheter, the eosinophilia spontaneously resolved, and at long-term follow up, the patient has a functioning non-antibiotic impregnated shunt catheter. Conclusions: Patients presenting with signs of shunt malfunction but without signs of CSF infection and with a raised CSF eosinophilia should be suspicious for cellular obstruction of their shunt system, i.e., sterile shunt malfunction.

AB - Introduction: Malfunction of cerebrospinal shunts is common and is due to multiple etiologies ranging from obstruction due to infiltrated brain tissue to mechanical disconnection. Discussion: We review the differential diagnosis and recommended evaluation and treatment for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) eosinophilia. Illustrative case: We report a child who, following the use of an antibiotics-impregnated ventricular catheter, developed sterile ventriculoperitoneal shunt malfunction thought to be due to profound CSF eosinophilia. Following removal of the catheter, the eosinophilia spontaneously resolved, and at long-term follow up, the patient has a functioning non-antibiotic impregnated shunt catheter. Conclusions: Patients presenting with signs of shunt malfunction but without signs of CSF infection and with a raised CSF eosinophilia should be suspicious for cellular obstruction of their shunt system, i.e., sterile shunt malfunction.

KW - Complications

KW - Hydrocephalus

KW - Pediatrics

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84860852986&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84860852986&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00381-011-1530-x

DO - 10.1007/s00381-011-1530-x

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 345

EP - 348

JO - Child's Nervous System

JF - Child's Nervous System

SN - 0256-7040

IS - 3

ER -