Verrucous lymphovascular malformation versus verrucous hemangioma: Controversial nomenclature

Allison Brown, Simon Warren, H. Wolfgang Losken, Dean S. Morrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) divides congenital vascular anomalies into malformations and tumors and subclassified hemangiomas under tumors. However, evidence shows this accepted classification has not been widely employed. Particularly troublesome is the use of the term hemangioma, commonly used to describe a variety of vascular lesions (both malformations and tumors). The term verrucous hemangioma has been used to describe a congenital vascular anomaly with a progressive verrucous epidermal surface persisting throughout life unless surgically excised. Recent evidence suggests that some of these lesions may share histologic features of both hemangiomas and malformations, thereby causing nosologic confusion. We report a 15-year-old adolescent girl with such a lesion and review the literature and controversy of verrucous hemangiomas. In our case, the most appropriate diagnosis is verrucous lymphovascular malformation. Further testing of similar lesions will be necessary to fully understand the nature and classification of these lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)390-396
Number of pages7
JournalCutis
Volume81
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Hemangioma
Terminology
Blood Vessels
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Verrucous lymphovascular malformation versus verrucous hemangioma : Controversial nomenclature. / Brown, Allison; Warren, Simon; Losken, H. Wolfgang; Morrell, Dean S.

In: Cutis, Vol. 81, No. 5, 05.2008, p. 390-396.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, A, Warren, S, Losken, HW & Morrell, DS 2008, 'Verrucous lymphovascular malformation versus verrucous hemangioma: Controversial nomenclature', Cutis, vol. 81, no. 5, pp. 390-396.
Brown, Allison ; Warren, Simon ; Losken, H. Wolfgang ; Morrell, Dean S. / Verrucous lymphovascular malformation versus verrucous hemangioma : Controversial nomenclature. In: Cutis. 2008 ; Vol. 81, No. 5. pp. 390-396.
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