Visual estimation of tumour extent is not an independent predictor of prostate specific antigen recurrence

Timothy D. Jones, Michael Koch, Haiqun Lin, Liang Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To analyse tumour extent as a predictor of cancer progression after radical prostatectomy (RP), using a multivariate Cox regression model, as several variables (e.g. Gleason grade and tumour stage) are well-established prognostic factors in prostate cancer but it is uncertain if the visual estimation of tumour extent (percentage of carcinoma) is an independent predictor for prostate cancer recurrence. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Tumour extent was estimated in the RP specimens from 504 men with clinically localized prostate cancer; clinical follow-up data were available for 459 men. The mean (range) follow-up was 44.3 (1.5-144) months. Cancer progression was defined by the development of biochemical recurrence, local recurrence, or distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis was used to assess tumour extent as a predictor of cancer progression. RESULTS: Of the 459 patients, 157 had cancer progression; the mean tumour extent was 36% and 24% in those with and without cancer progression, respectively (P < 0.001). Univariate analysis showed a significant association between the visual estimation of tumour extent and tumour stage, Gleason grade, surgical margins, extraprostatic extension, seminal vesicle invasion, lymph node metastasis, and preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen level (all P < 0.001). However, in a multivariate Cox regression model controlling for pathological stage, Gleason score, and surgical margin status, the visual estimation of tumour extent was no longer a significant predictor of cancer progression (P = 0.84). CONCLUSION: The visual estimation of tumour extent was associated with various established prognostic factors for prostate cancer, and with cancer progression in a univariate analysis, but it was not a significant predictor of cancer progression in the multivariate analysis controlling for pathological stage, Gleason score, and surgical margin status.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1253-1257
Number of pages5
JournalBJU International
Volume96
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005

Fingerprint

Prostate-Specific Antigen
Recurrence
Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Neoplasm Grading
Prostatectomy
Proportional Hazards Models
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm Metastasis
Seminal Vesicles

Keywords

  • Cancer progression
  • Neoplasm
  • Prostate
  • Prostatectomy
  • PSA
  • Recurrence
  • TNM staging
  • Tumour extent
  • Tumour volume

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Visual estimation of tumour extent is not an independent predictor of prostate specific antigen recurrence. / Jones, Timothy D.; Koch, Michael; Lin, Haiqun; Cheng, Liang.

In: BJU International, Vol. 96, No. 9, 12.2005, p. 1253-1257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To analyse tumour extent as a predictor of cancer progression after radical prostatectomy (RP), using a multivariate Cox regression model, as several variables (e.g. Gleason grade and tumour stage) are well-established prognostic factors in prostate cancer but it is uncertain if the visual estimation of tumour extent (percentage of carcinoma) is an independent predictor for prostate cancer recurrence. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Tumour extent was estimated in the RP specimens from 504 men with clinically localized prostate cancer; clinical follow-up data were available for 459 men. The mean (range) follow-up was 44.3 (1.5-144) months. Cancer progression was defined by the development of biochemical recurrence, local recurrence, or distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis was used to assess tumour extent as a predictor of cancer progression. RESULTS: Of the 459 patients, 157 had cancer progression; the mean tumour extent was 36{\%} and 24{\%} in those with and without cancer progression, respectively (P < 0.001). Univariate analysis showed a significant association between the visual estimation of tumour extent and tumour stage, Gleason grade, surgical margins, extraprostatic extension, seminal vesicle invasion, lymph node metastasis, and preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen level (all P < 0.001). However, in a multivariate Cox regression model controlling for pathological stage, Gleason score, and surgical margin status, the visual estimation of tumour extent was no longer a significant predictor of cancer progression (P = 0.84). CONCLUSION: The visual estimation of tumour extent was associated with various established prognostic factors for prostate cancer, and with cancer progression in a univariate analysis, but it was not a significant predictor of cancer progression in the multivariate analysis controlling for pathological stage, Gleason score, and surgical margin status.",
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