Visual habituation in deaf and hearing infants

Claire Monroy, Carissa Shafto, Irina Castellanos, Tonya Bergeson-Dana, Derek Houston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Early cognitive development relies on the sensory experiences that infants acquire as they explore their environment. Atypical experience in one sensory modality from birth may result in fundamental differences in general cognitive abilities. The primary aim of the current study was to compare visual habituation in infants with profound hearing loss, prior to receiving cochlear implants (CIs), and age-matched peers with typical hearing. Two complementary measures of cognitive function and attention maintenance were assessed: the length of time to habituate to a visual stimulus, and look-away rate during habituation. Findings revealed that deaf infants were slower to habituate to a visual stimulus and demonstrated a lower look-away rate than hearing infants. For deaf infants, habituation measures correlated with language outcomes on standardized assessments before cochlear implantation. These findings are consistent with prior evidence suggesting that habituation and look-away rates reflect efficiency of information processing and may suggest that deaf infants take longer to process visual stimuli relative to the hearing infants. Taken together, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that hearing loss early in infancy influences aspects of general cognitive functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0209265
JournalPLoS One
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Audition
hearing
Hearing
Cochlear implants
Hearing Loss
cognitive development
infancy
peers
cognition
Cochlear Implantation
Aptitude
Cochlear Implants
Automatic Data Processing
Cognition
Language
Maintenance
Parturition
Efficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Monroy, C., Shafto, C., Castellanos, I., Bergeson-Dana, T., & Houston, D. (2019). Visual habituation in deaf and hearing infants. PLoS One, 14(2), [e0209265]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0209265

Visual habituation in deaf and hearing infants. / Monroy, Claire; Shafto, Carissa; Castellanos, Irina; Bergeson-Dana, Tonya; Houston, Derek.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 14, No. 2, e0209265, 01.02.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Monroy, C, Shafto, C, Castellanos, I, Bergeson-Dana, T & Houston, D 2019, 'Visual habituation in deaf and hearing infants', PLoS One, vol. 14, no. 2, e0209265. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0209265
Monroy C, Shafto C, Castellanos I, Bergeson-Dana T, Houston D. Visual habituation in deaf and hearing infants. PLoS One. 2019 Feb 1;14(2). e0209265. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0209265
Monroy, Claire ; Shafto, Carissa ; Castellanos, Irina ; Bergeson-Dana, Tonya ; Houston, Derek. / Visual habituation in deaf and hearing infants. In: PLoS One. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 2.
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