Vitamin D and calcium receptors: Links to hypercalciuria

Shaochun Bai, Murray J. Favus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In idiopathic hypercalciuria, patients have increased intestinal Ca absorption and decreased renal Ca reabsorption, with either elevated or normal serum levels of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. As 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D exerts its biologic effects through interactions with the vitamin D receptor, we examine the actions of this receptor and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in animals with genetic hypercalciuria. RECENT FINDINGS: In genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming rats intestinal calcium transport is increased and renal calcium reabsorption is reduced, yet serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels are normal. Elevated intestinal and kidney vitamin D receptors suggest that increased tissue 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-vitamin D receptor complexes enhance 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D actions on intestine and kidney, and vitamin D-dependent over-expression of renal calcium-sensing receptor alone can decrease tubule calcium reabsorption. In TRPV5-knockout mice, ablation of the renal calcium-influx channel decreases tubular calcium reabsorption, and secondary elevations in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D increase intestinal calcium transport. SUMMARY: 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D or vitamin D receptor may change intestinal and renal epithelial calcium transport simultaneously or calcium-transport changes across renal epithelia may be primary with a vitamin D-mediated secondary increase in intestinal transport. The extent of homology between the animal models and human idiopathic hypercalciuria remains to be determined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)381-385
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Calcium-Sensing Receptors
Hypercalciuria
Calcitriol Receptors
Calcium
Kidney
Vitamin D
1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D
Intestinal Absorption
Calcium Channels
Serum
Knockout Mice
Intestines
Epithelium
Animal Models

Keywords

  • 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D
  • Calcium-sensing receptor
  • Hypercalciuria
  • Hypercalciuric rats
  • Knockout mice
  • Vitamin D receptor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Vitamin D and calcium receptors : Links to hypercalciuria. / Bai, Shaochun; Favus, Murray J.

In: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension, Vol. 15, No. 4, 07.2006, p. 381-385.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bai, Shaochun ; Favus, Murray J. / Vitamin D and calcium receptors : Links to hypercalciuria. In: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension. 2006 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 381-385.
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