Vitamin D metabolites in post‐menopausal women and their relationship to the myopathic electromyogram

PHILIP J. HEYBURN, MUNRO PEACOCK, IAN F. CASSON, RICHARD G. CRILLY, GEOFFREY A. TAYLOR

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Abstract. Proximal muscular weakness is a feature of many metabolic bone diseases but is not well recognized in spinal osteoporosis. Thirty‐six post‐menopausal women presenting with back pain, with or without osteoporosis, were therefore studied in order to define the relationship between abnormal electromyographic findings and disturbed vitamin D metabolism, as both low plasma 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D concentrations and malabsorption of calcium have been reported in osteoporosis. Patients with abnormal electromyograms had lower concentrations of plasma 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D (mean 78.3 pmol/1, SD 20.5, n=15) than normal subjects of similar age (mean 110.4 pmol/1, SD 39.4, n= 21; P<0.01), but electromyographic abnormality was not associated with changes in radiocalcium absorption, plasma 25 hydroxy vitamin D, plasma calcium or phosphate or urinary calcium or hydroxyproline excretion or impaired renal function. There was no relationship between abnormal electromyography and osteroporosis assessed by spinal radiographs and iliac crest biopsy. These findings are consistent with our previous suggestion that muscle weakness in many unrelated bone disorders is related to low plasma 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D concentrations, but suggest that there is no relationship between proximal myopathy and spinal osteoporosis in post‐menopausal women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-44
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Investigation
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1983

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry

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