Web-Based Educational Seminars Compare Favorably with In-House Seminars for Bariatric Surgery Patients

Sara Monfared, Anna Martin, Kamna Gupta, Dimitrios Stefanidis, Don Selzer, Jennifer Choi, Annabelle Butler, Ambar Banerjee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Comprehensive preparative patient education is a key element in bariatric patient success. The primary objective of this study was to compare attrition rates, demographics, and surgery outcomes between patients who participated in the online vs in-house preparative seminars. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed involving patients who chose to participate in online vs in-house educational seminar between July of 2014 and December of 2016. The patients were divided into two groups based on their choice of educational seminar and tracked to see how many made it to an initial visit and to surgery. In those who had bariatric surgery, data was collected on age, type of insurance, length of stay (LOS), longest follow-up, and change in body mass index. Results: Total of 1230 patients were included in this study. There was no difference in attrition rate to initial consultation visit (29.1% vs 29.9%), but there was a statistically higher attrition to surgery in the in-house seminar attendees (72.9%) compared to online participants (66.6%, p < 0.05). Between January 2015 and December 2016, 291 patients underwent primary bariatric surgery. The online group was on average 3 years younger which was statistically significant. There were no differences in LOS, longest follow-up, and weight loss at 12 months between the groups. Conclusion: When comparing attrition rates and bariatric surgery outcomes, no overall difference was noted between patients who received web- or hospital-based preparative education. Bariatric programs should provide access to online seminars to attract younger population and save resources and cost.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalObesity Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Bariatric Surgery
Bariatrics
Length of Stay
Patient Education
Insurance
Weight Loss
Body Mass Index
Referral and Consultation
Demography
Education
Costs and Cost Analysis
Population

Keywords

  • Bariatric surgery
  • Live seminar
  • Online seminar
  • Patient education
  • Web-based seminar

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Web-Based Educational Seminars Compare Favorably with In-House Seminars for Bariatric Surgery Patients. / Monfared, Sara; Martin, Anna; Gupta, Kamna; Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Selzer, Don; Choi, Jennifer; Butler, Annabelle; Banerjee, Ambar.

In: Obesity Surgery, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Monfared, Sara ; Martin, Anna ; Gupta, Kamna ; Stefanidis, Dimitrios ; Selzer, Don ; Choi, Jennifer ; Butler, Annabelle ; Banerjee, Ambar. / Web-Based Educational Seminars Compare Favorably with In-House Seminars for Bariatric Surgery Patients. In: Obesity Surgery. 2018.
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