Weight loss attitudes and social forces in urban poor Black and White women

Ni Cole R Keith, Kimberly A. Hemmerlein, Daniel O. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To explore differences between Blacks and Whites in perceived influences on weight-related behaviors among obese urban poor women.

METHODS: Participants (N = 27) received physician referrals to a weight loss program located in Federally Qualified Health Centers and either never attended or stopped attending. We conducted in-depth, in home interviews using a script informed by focus groups, pilot discussions, and the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to learn about participants' weight loss attitudes, social forces and perceived behavioral control.

RESULTS: White women reported having more social support and social pressure for weight management activities. Black women reported eating for positive reasons whereas white women associated eating with negative emotions.

CONCLUSION: Social networks and emotions may be critical factors in weight management and lifestyle program participation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-42
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Weight Loss
eating behavior
Weights and Measures
Social Support
Emotions
emotion
Eating
Weight Reduction Programs
social attitude
Focus Groups
management
social support
Life Style
social network
Referral and Consultation
physician
Interviews
Physicians
Pressure
participation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Weight loss attitudes and social forces in urban poor Black and White women. / Keith, Ni Cole R; Hemmerlein, Kimberly A.; Clark, Daniel O.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 39, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 34-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Keith, Ni Cole R ; Hemmerlein, Kimberly A. ; Clark, Daniel O. / Weight loss attitudes and social forces in urban poor Black and White women. In: American Journal of Health Behavior. 2015 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 34-42.
@article{bf322ba5869d4b40b0d9ece260fc1d42,
title = "Weight loss attitudes and social forces in urban poor Black and White women",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To explore differences between Blacks and Whites in perceived influences on weight-related behaviors among obese urban poor women.METHODS: Participants (N = 27) received physician referrals to a weight loss program located in Federally Qualified Health Centers and either never attended or stopped attending. We conducted in-depth, in home interviews using a script informed by focus groups, pilot discussions, and the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to learn about participants' weight loss attitudes, social forces and perceived behavioral control.RESULTS: White women reported having more social support and social pressure for weight management activities. Black women reported eating for positive reasons whereas white women associated eating with negative emotions.CONCLUSION: Social networks and emotions may be critical factors in weight management and lifestyle program participation.",
author = "Keith, {Ni Cole R} and Hemmerlein, {Kimberly A.} and Clark, {Daniel O.}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.5993/AJHB.39.1.4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "34--42",
journal = "American Journal of Health Behavior",
issn = "1087-3244",
publisher = "PNG Publications",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Weight loss attitudes and social forces in urban poor Black and White women

AU - Keith, Ni Cole R

AU - Hemmerlein, Kimberly A.

AU - Clark, Daniel O.

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To explore differences between Blacks and Whites in perceived influences on weight-related behaviors among obese urban poor women.METHODS: Participants (N = 27) received physician referrals to a weight loss program located in Federally Qualified Health Centers and either never attended or stopped attending. We conducted in-depth, in home interviews using a script informed by focus groups, pilot discussions, and the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to learn about participants' weight loss attitudes, social forces and perceived behavioral control.RESULTS: White women reported having more social support and social pressure for weight management activities. Black women reported eating for positive reasons whereas white women associated eating with negative emotions.CONCLUSION: Social networks and emotions may be critical factors in weight management and lifestyle program participation.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To explore differences between Blacks and Whites in perceived influences on weight-related behaviors among obese urban poor women.METHODS: Participants (N = 27) received physician referrals to a weight loss program located in Federally Qualified Health Centers and either never attended or stopped attending. We conducted in-depth, in home interviews using a script informed by focus groups, pilot discussions, and the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to learn about participants' weight loss attitudes, social forces and perceived behavioral control.RESULTS: White women reported having more social support and social pressure for weight management activities. Black women reported eating for positive reasons whereas white women associated eating with negative emotions.CONCLUSION: Social networks and emotions may be critical factors in weight management and lifestyle program participation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84979854832&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84979854832&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5993/AJHB.39.1.4

DO - 10.5993/AJHB.39.1.4

M3 - Article

VL - 39

SP - 34

EP - 42

JO - American Journal of Health Behavior

JF - American Journal of Health Behavior

SN - 1087-3244

IS - 1

ER -