West Nile encephalitis and myelitis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of review: This article will review the recent experience with West Nile virus encephalitis and myelitis. Recent findings: In the summer of 2003, the majority of cases of West Nile virus infection in the United States were reported from the western states. The transmission of West Nile virus through blood transfusion and organ transplantation was recognized and blood collection agencies implemented West Nile virus nucleic acid-amplification tests to identify infected donors. Intrauterine transmission of West Nile virus infection was reported. The identification of West Nile virus immunoglobulin M in cerebrospinal fluid is the recommended test to document central nervous system infection, but this test may not be positive in spinal fluid collected less than 8 days after the onset of symptoms. Serial samples of cerebrospinal fluid may be required to identify the antibodies. A clinical trial got underway to evaluate the efficacy of human immunoglobulin with high titers of antibodies to West Nile virus in the therapy of West Nile virus encephalitis and myelitis. Summary: In the summer of 2003, the majority of cases of West Nile virus infection in the United States were reported from states west of the Mississippi river. The identification of West Nile virus IgM in CSF is the recommended test to document CNS infection. A single serum antibody titer is an unreliable test of recent infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)343-346
Number of pages4
JournalCurrent Opinion in Neurology
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2004

Fingerprint

Myelitis
West Nile virus
Encephalitis
Virus Diseases
Immunoglobulin M
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Antibodies
Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques
Mississippi
Central Nervous System Infections
Organ Transplantation
Infection
Rivers
Blood Transfusion
Immunoglobulins
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • Myelitis
  • West Nile encephalitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

West Nile encephalitis and myelitis. / Roos, Karen.

In: Current Opinion in Neurology, Vol. 17, No. 3, 06.2004, p. 343-346.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ee73a51b604d441199e1c40865a4d40d,
title = "West Nile encephalitis and myelitis",
abstract = "Purpose of review: This article will review the recent experience with West Nile virus encephalitis and myelitis. Recent findings: In the summer of 2003, the majority of cases of West Nile virus infection in the United States were reported from the western states. The transmission of West Nile virus through blood transfusion and organ transplantation was recognized and blood collection agencies implemented West Nile virus nucleic acid-amplification tests to identify infected donors. Intrauterine transmission of West Nile virus infection was reported. The identification of West Nile virus immunoglobulin M in cerebrospinal fluid is the recommended test to document central nervous system infection, but this test may not be positive in spinal fluid collected less than 8 days after the onset of symptoms. Serial samples of cerebrospinal fluid may be required to identify the antibodies. A clinical trial got underway to evaluate the efficacy of human immunoglobulin with high titers of antibodies to West Nile virus in the therapy of West Nile virus encephalitis and myelitis. Summary: In the summer of 2003, the majority of cases of West Nile virus infection in the United States were reported from states west of the Mississippi river. The identification of West Nile virus IgM in CSF is the recommended test to document CNS infection. A single serum antibody titer is an unreliable test of recent infection.",
keywords = "Myelitis, West Nile encephalitis",
author = "Karen Roos",
year = "2004",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1097/00019052-200406000-00016",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "343--346",
journal = "Current Opinion in Neurology",
issn = "1350-7540",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - West Nile encephalitis and myelitis

AU - Roos, Karen

PY - 2004/6

Y1 - 2004/6

N2 - Purpose of review: This article will review the recent experience with West Nile virus encephalitis and myelitis. Recent findings: In the summer of 2003, the majority of cases of West Nile virus infection in the United States were reported from the western states. The transmission of West Nile virus through blood transfusion and organ transplantation was recognized and blood collection agencies implemented West Nile virus nucleic acid-amplification tests to identify infected donors. Intrauterine transmission of West Nile virus infection was reported. The identification of West Nile virus immunoglobulin M in cerebrospinal fluid is the recommended test to document central nervous system infection, but this test may not be positive in spinal fluid collected less than 8 days after the onset of symptoms. Serial samples of cerebrospinal fluid may be required to identify the antibodies. A clinical trial got underway to evaluate the efficacy of human immunoglobulin with high titers of antibodies to West Nile virus in the therapy of West Nile virus encephalitis and myelitis. Summary: In the summer of 2003, the majority of cases of West Nile virus infection in the United States were reported from states west of the Mississippi river. The identification of West Nile virus IgM in CSF is the recommended test to document CNS infection. A single serum antibody titer is an unreliable test of recent infection.

AB - Purpose of review: This article will review the recent experience with West Nile virus encephalitis and myelitis. Recent findings: In the summer of 2003, the majority of cases of West Nile virus infection in the United States were reported from the western states. The transmission of West Nile virus through blood transfusion and organ transplantation was recognized and blood collection agencies implemented West Nile virus nucleic acid-amplification tests to identify infected donors. Intrauterine transmission of West Nile virus infection was reported. The identification of West Nile virus immunoglobulin M in cerebrospinal fluid is the recommended test to document central nervous system infection, but this test may not be positive in spinal fluid collected less than 8 days after the onset of symptoms. Serial samples of cerebrospinal fluid may be required to identify the antibodies. A clinical trial got underway to evaluate the efficacy of human immunoglobulin with high titers of antibodies to West Nile virus in the therapy of West Nile virus encephalitis and myelitis. Summary: In the summer of 2003, the majority of cases of West Nile virus infection in the United States were reported from states west of the Mississippi river. The identification of West Nile virus IgM in CSF is the recommended test to document CNS infection. A single serum antibody titer is an unreliable test of recent infection.

KW - Myelitis

KW - West Nile encephalitis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=2642513119&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=2642513119&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00019052-200406000-00016

DO - 10.1097/00019052-200406000-00016

M3 - Article

C2 - 15167070

AN - SCOPUS:2642513119

VL - 17

SP - 343

EP - 346

JO - Current Opinion in Neurology

JF - Current Opinion in Neurology

SN - 1350-7540

IS - 3

ER -