What have we learned about the contribution of autonomic nervous system to human arrhythmia?

Masahiro Ogawa, Shengmei Zhou, Alex Y. Tan, Michael C. Fishbein, Shien Fong Lin, Lan S. Chen, Peng Sheng Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Myocardial infarction results in denervation, followed by neural remodeling characterized by nerve sprouting and heterogeneous sympathetic hyperinnervation throughout the myocardium. There is an association between the density of sympathetic nerves and occurrence of cardiac arrhythmia in humans. Autonomic nerve recording in ambulatory dogs showed a close association between autonomic nerve activity and paroxysmal atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Cryoablation of the stellate ganglion prevented paroxysmal atrial tachycardia and atrial fibrillation in canine models. Further studies are needed to determine if these same methods can be used to control atrial arrhythmias in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S8-S11
JournalHeart Rhythm
Volume6
Issue number8 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009

Keywords

  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Cryoablation
  • Nerve sprouting
  • Stellate ganglion
  • Sudden cardiac death

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

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    Ogawa, M., Zhou, S., Tan, A. Y., Fishbein, M. C., Lin, S. F., Chen, L. S., & Chen, P. S. (2009). What have we learned about the contribution of autonomic nervous system to human arrhythmia? Heart Rhythm, 6(8 SUPPL.), S8-S11. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hrthm.2009.02.015