What Should a Psychiatrist Know About Genetics? Review and Recommendations From the Residency Education Committee of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics

John Nurnberger, Jehannine Austin, Wade H. Berrettini, Aaron D. Besterman, Lynn E. DeLisi, Dorothy E. Grice, James L. Kennedy, Daniel Moreno-De-Luca, James B. Potash, David A. Ross, Thomas G. Schulze, Gwyneth Zai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The International Society of Psychiatric Genetics (ISPG) created a Residency Education Committee with the purpose of identifying key genetic knowledge that should be taught in psychiatric training programs. Thirteen committee members were appointed by the ISPG Board of Directors, based on varied training, expertise, gender, and national origin. The Committee has met quarterly for the past 2 years, with periodic reports to the Board and to the members of the Society. The information summarized includes the existing literature in the field of psychiatric genetics and the output of ongoing large genomics consortia. An outline of clinically relevant areas of genetic knowledge was developed, circulated, and approved. This document was expanded and annotated with appropriate references, and the manuscript was developed. Specific information regarding the contribution of common and rare genetic variants to major psychiatric disorders and treatment response is now available. Current challenges include the following: (1) Genetic testing is recommended in the evaluation of autism and intellectual disability, but its use is limited in current clinical practice. (2) Commercial pharmacogenomic testing is widely available, but its utility has not yet been clearly established. (3) Other methods, such as whole exome and whole genome sequencing, will soon be clinically applicable. The need for informed genetic counseling in psychiatry is greater than ever before, knowledge in the field is rapidly growing, and genetic education should become an integral part of psychiatric training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe Journal of clinical psychiatry
Volume80
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 27 2018

Fingerprint

Internship and Residency
Psychiatry
Education
Committee Membership
Exome
Manuscripts
Genetic Counseling
Genetic Testing
Autistic Disorder
Genomics
Intellectual Disability
Genome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

What Should a Psychiatrist Know About Genetics? Review and Recommendations From the Residency Education Committee of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics. / Nurnberger, John; Austin, Jehannine; Berrettini, Wade H.; Besterman, Aaron D.; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Grice, Dorothy E.; Kennedy, James L.; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Potash, James B.; Ross, David A.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Zai, Gwyneth.

In: The Journal of clinical psychiatry, Vol. 80, No. 1, 27.11.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nurnberger, J, Austin, J, Berrettini, WH, Besterman, AD, DeLisi, LE, Grice, DE, Kennedy, JL, Moreno-De-Luca, D, Potash, JB, Ross, DA, Schulze, TG & Zai, G 2018, 'What Should a Psychiatrist Know About Genetics? Review and Recommendations From the Residency Education Committee of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics', The Journal of clinical psychiatry, vol. 80, no. 1. https://doi.org/10.4088/JCP.17nr12046
Nurnberger, John ; Austin, Jehannine ; Berrettini, Wade H. ; Besterman, Aaron D. ; DeLisi, Lynn E. ; Grice, Dorothy E. ; Kennedy, James L. ; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel ; Potash, James B. ; Ross, David A. ; Schulze, Thomas G. ; Zai, Gwyneth. / What Should a Psychiatrist Know About Genetics? Review and Recommendations From the Residency Education Committee of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics. In: The Journal of clinical psychiatry. 2018 ; Vol. 80, No. 1.
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